i wished i couLd write

and the devil said 'go ahead'.

"We claim autonomy for ourselves and forget that in so doing we can fall into the tyranny of defining other people as we would like them to be. By focusing on what we choose to acknowledge in them, we impose an insidious control on them. I notice that I have to pay careful attention in order to listen to others with an openness that allows them to be as they are, or as they think themselves to be.

The opposite of this inattention is love, is the honoring of others in a way that grants them the grace of their own autonomy and allows mutual discovery.”

—Anne Truitt, via Brainpickings (via thepianofarm)

time.

time. http://wp.me/sXdOw-time

lego - _0003

This is another excuse to write on a sketchblog.

I want to teach the internet things it doesn’t know and show it pictures it hasn’t seen, and would never see, unless I found an excuse for it.

This one is about my grandfather.

His name was Nikos, like mine, which is what usually happens to grandkids and their grandparents in Greece, which is also coincidental and lucky, because he was not my real…

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tsamikos. - on the #sketchblog.

Στα κακοτράχαλα τα βουνά με το σουράβλι και το ζουρνά πάνω στην πέτρα την αγιασμένη χορεύουν τώρα τρεις αντρειωμένοι.

tsamikos. - on the #sketchblog.

Στα κακοτράχαλα τα βουνά με το σουράβλι και το ζουρνά πάνω στην πέτρα την αγιασμένη χορεύουν τώρα τρεις αντρειωμένοι.

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut
In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”
I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”
Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”
I said, “Saul, are you gifted?”
Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

austinkleon:

Saul Steinberg and Kurt Vonnegut

In A Man Without A Country, Vonnegut called Steinberg “the wisest person I ever met in my entire life”:

I could ask him anything, and six seconds would pass, and then he would give me a perfect answer, gruffly, almost a growl. He was born in Romania, in a house where, according to him, “the geese looked in the windows.”

I said, “Saul, how should I feel about Picasso?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “God put him on Earth to show us what it’s like to be really rich.” I said, “Saul, I am a novelist, and many of my friends are novelists and good ones, but when we talk I keep feeling we are in a very different businesses. What makes me feel that way?”

Six seconds passed, and then he said, “It’s very simple. There are two sorts of artists, one not being in the least superior to the other. But one responds to the history of his or her art so far, and the other responds to life itself.”

I said, “Saul, are you gifted?

Six seconds passed, and then he growled, “No. But what you respond to in any work of art is the artist’s struggle against his or her limitations.’

Filed under: Steinberg, Vonnegut

(via darksilenceinsuburbia)

Begin with something in your range. Then write it as a secret. I’d be paralyzed if I thought I had to write a great novel, and no matter how good I think a book is on one day, I know now that a time will come when I will look upon it as a failure. The gratification has to come from the effort itself. I try not to look back. I approach the work as though, in truth, I’m nothing and the words are everything. Then I write to save my life. If you are a writer, that will be true.

—Louise Erdrich via Matt Bell (via thepianofarm)

(Source: theparisreview.org, via thepianofarm)

untrustyou:

Mark S. Wexler
The ‘pole of cold’ region in northeastern Siberia is the coldest permanently inhabited place on earth, especially the region centered around Oymyakon and Verkhoyansk where January temperatures average around -65°F. During the Soviet era children underwent ultraviolet treatment to make up for the long, dark, and cold Siberian winters with the consequent lack of sunlight.

untrustyou:

Mark S. Wexler

The ‘pole of cold’ region in northeastern Siberia is the coldest permanently inhabited place on earth, especially the region centered around Oymyakon and Verkhoyansk where January temperatures average around -65°F. During the Soviet era children underwent ultraviolet treatment to make up for the long, dark, and cold Siberian winters with the consequent lack of sunlight.